What A Functional Assessment Is

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A functional assessment is an approach to figuring out why your child acts a certain way. It uses a variety of techniques to understand what’s behind inappropriate behaviors.

This includes looking at non-academic factors that might be contributing to your child’s frustration with learning.

Knowing what’s behind inappropriate behavior can help you and the school find ways to change the behavior. The basic idea behind this approach is that your child’s behavior serves a purpose.

Whether he’s aware of it or not, your child acts a certain way to get to a desired outcome or goal.For Educational Evaluations in US visit UT Evaluators.

For example, perhaps your child has a hard time showing his work on math problems. In math class, he gets angry, crumples up the paper and is disruptive. He’s sent to the principal’s office.

The behavior isn’t appropriate, but it served its purpose. Your child managed to avoid doing the work that was frustrating him. He may not know that was his goal, but he found a way to deal with the math that was causing him stress.

A key part of a functional assessment is figuring out what triggers certain behaviors in your child at home, in school and with friends.

Sometimes parents and teachers assume they know what’s causing a child’s behavior because they’ve seen other children do similar things. But it’s important to remember that the causes for the same behavior can vary widely among children.

Functional Assessment vs. Comprehensive Evaluation

A functional assessment has a narrower focus than a comprehensive evaluation. It focuses on the why, how, where, when and what of your child’s behavior.

A comprehensive evaluation is a process that’s used to see if your child is eligible for special education services. It looks at all aspects of your child’s learning.

If behavior is a concern, a functional assessment may be part of the comprehensive evaluation process.

The Functional Assessment Team

Assessment is a team effort. Each team member sees your child from a different perspective. Everyone works together to figure out what’s going on with your child’s behavior.

The assessment team varies from school to school. It typically includes a person with specialized training, such as a school psychologist or behavior specialist.

That professional helps to gather information. She interviews people who know and work with your child. She will also speak with your child and do some screenings or assessments.To know more information on Educational Evaluations in US visit Tweetcast

A functional assessment team might also include:

A. General education teachers

B. Special education teachers

C. Professionals who work with your child (counselors and speech therapists, for example)

D. School administrators

E. Parents and caregivers

F. Your child

Although they’re not part of the team, your child’s peers can also shed light on your child’s behavior.

Which Is Better, A 504 Plan Or An IEP?

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My fifth grader is having trouble following directions and finishing his work, especially in math. The teacher mentioned having him evaluated for either an IEP or a 504 plan. Are the evaluations different for IEPs and 504 plans?

Technically speaking, yes. The evaluations are different because Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and 504 plans are covered by different laws.

They also serve different purposes. But sometimes, an IEP evaluation can also serve as a 504 plan evaluation.

Broadly speaking, an IEP provides special education supports and services. That includes specially designed instruction. The purpose of a 504 plan is to provide supports so a student has access to learning.

That typically means accommodations and perhaps some related services. Occasionally special instruction can be included, but not often.

A look at the laws behind IEPs and 504 plans explains why they have different evaluations. For Educational Evaluations in US visit UT Evaluators.

An IEP is covered under IDEA, which entitles students with disabilities to a free and appropriate education. The law covers 13 categories of disability.

To get an IEP, a student must qualify under one of those categories. A student with a learning or thinking difference may fall into one of them.

To know if your child qualifies, a full evaluation is required. This involves educational testing and other assessments.

The IEP team has to look at all of his needs in these areas:

A. Health

B. Vision

C. Social and emotional development

D. Learning potential

E. Academic performance

F. Communication skills

G. Motor skills

504 plans work differently. They’re covered by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, a civil rights law. Their purpose is to give students with physical or mental “impairments” access to education.

In order to be eligible for a 504 plan, a student must show that he has a condition that substantially limits one or more major life activities. Learning is one of those life activities.

For a 504 plan, the student doesn’t need to have the full evaluation that’s required for an IEP, however. He only has to show that he has a disability that qualifies under Section 504.

So the evaluation might include:

A. A review of his work

B. A review of his medical records and evaluation reports

C. Direct observation

D. Interview with the student, parent, and school personnel

E. Other assessments

If that’s all the 504 team needs to determine if the student is eligible, then that’s all the evaluation will include.To know more details on  Educational Evaluations in US visit Cidoc2015

But sometimes the team wants more information. It might ask for other testing. Or it might request a full evaluation like the one required for an IEP.

Despite their differences, IEPs and 504s have the same goal: to get your child the help he needs. The evaluation process can be complex, however, so it helps to know as much as possible going into it.

Get more details on how evaluations for IEPs work. And see a visual guide that lays out the different steps in the evaluation process.

What Are The Importance Of Educational Measurement, Assessment & Evaluation

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As teachers become more familiar with data-driven instruction, they are making decisions about what and how they teach based on the information gathered from their students. In other words, teachers first find out what their students know and what they do not know, and then determine how best to bridge that gap.

How Are Measurement, Assessment and Evaluation Different?

During the process of gathering information for effective planning and instruction, the words measurement, assessment and evaluation are often used interchangeably. These words, however, have significantly different meanings. For Educational Evaluations in US visit UT Evaluators.

Measurement

The word measurement, as it applies to education, is not substantially different from when it is used in any other field. It simply means determining the attributes or dimensions of an object, skill or knowledge. We use common objects in the physical world to measure, such as tape measures, scales and meters. These measurement tools are held to standards and can be used to obtain reliable results. When used properly, they accurately gather data for educators and administrators.

Some standard measurements in education are raw scores, percentile ranks and standard scores.

Assessment

One of the primary measurement tools in education is the assessment. Teachers gather information by giving tests, conducting interviews and monitoring behavior. The assessment should be carefully prepared and administered to ensure its reliability and validity. In other words, an assessment must provide consistent results and it must measure what it claims to measure.

Evaluation

Creating valid and reliable assessments is critical to accurately measuring educational data. Evaluating the information gathered, however, is equally important to the effective use of the information for instruction.

In education, evaluation is the process of using the measurements gathered in the assessments. Teachers use this information to judge the relationship between what was intended by the instruction and what was learned. They evaluate the information gathered to determine what students know and understand, how far they have progressed and how fast, and how their scores and progress compare to those of other students.

Why Are Measurement, Assessment and Evaluation Important in Education?

According to educator and author, Graham Nuthall, in his book The Hidden Lives of Learners, “In most of the classrooms we have studied, each student already knows about 40-50% of what the teacher is teaching.” The goal of data-driven instruction is to avoid teaching students what they already know and teach what they do not know in a way the students will best respond to. To know more info on Educational Evaluations check Painpeters

For the same reason, educators and administrators understand that assessing students and evaluating the results must be ongoing and frequent. Scheduled assessments are important to the process, but teachers must also be prepared to re-assess students, even if informally, when they sense students are either bored with the daily lesson or frustrated by material they are not prepared for.

Using the measurements of these intermittent formative assessments, teachers can fine-tune instruction to meet the needs of their students on a daily and weekly basis.

What Is Reevaluation

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A reevaluation is used to confirm your student’s continued eligibility for special education and related services. Reevaluations are needed when your student’s needs change to the extent that the current evaluation does not provide enough information for the IEP team to revise your student’s IEP. For Educational Evaluations in US visit here

1. How often can I get my student reevaluated?

Reevaluations can occur:

A. Not more than once a year, unless the parent and district agree that a reevaluation should occur sooner; or

B. At least once every 3 years, unless the parent and the district agree that a reevaluation is unnecessary.

2.How long does a school district have to complete a reevaluation?

A reevaluation needs to occur within 35 school days after the district receives your consent for the reevaluation. The timeline for completing the reevaluation will be less than 35 school days if the required 3-year timeline ends sooner.

3. What is included in a reevaluation?

A reevaluation includes:

A. A review of all existing data on your student – which includes the most recent evaluations, classroom based tests and statewide assessments, classroom based observations, observations by teachers and other services providers, and information and observations provided by you.

B. Any additional assessments from qualified professionals to determine your student’s continued eligibility for special education and related services.

C. A determination of whether your student needs additional services or modifications to meet her/his annual goals.

D. A determination as to the extent your student can participate, as appropriate, in the general education curriculum.

An Essay On Education And Evaluation

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Education and evaluation are inter-related processes. Evaluation is as old as the process of education itself. Education in its wider sense implies not only acquisition of knowledge, but also development of abilities, skills, personality qualities which are important in individual’s personal and social life. The function of evaluation in education is to provide a systematic assessment of the development of these qualities as an outcome of educational endeavour. Since population education is also an educational process aiming at inculcating rational attitude and responsible behaviour among the learners towards population and development issues and helping them to take informed decisions, role of evaluation is of utmost importance. Without the benefit of evaluation, one is unable to determine how well the programme has achieved its goal. Evaluation also serves as the basis for the improvement of the way activities are carried out. Evaluation is also an effort at discovering whether certain activities have led to desired effects or outcomes. Check for Educational Evaluations in US at UT Evaluators

Evaluation in education means describing something, in terms of selected attributes and judging the degree of acceptability or suitability of that which has been described. The something which is described can be any aspect of the educational scene. In broadest sense, the term evaluation is defined as a systematic assessment of the value or worth of ‘something’. This ‘something’ could be a programme or a segment of a programme, a technique or strategy used, educational materials or a situation prevalent in a particular community. It is also defined as the collection and use of information to make decisions about an educational programme like population education programme. Principles of evaluation in population education are essentially principles of evaluation in education. It is true that evaluation in population education is difficult because population education aims at effecting behavioural changes in the affective domain to a greater degree. It has cognitive component only to the extent that is needed to bring attitudinal changes.

Effort, effect, adequacy, efficiency and process are the five major aspects that must be assessed in order to ascertain success or failure f population education programme. When programme implementers evaluate effort, they try to measure the quantity as well as the quality of available resources. This type of evaluation is called input evaluation. It involves taking of all available resources, both human and material (personnel, money, educational tools, methods or techniques), and of the activities generated by these resources. The number of qualified personnel, logistics required for programme operation, the number of educational materials distributed to the target audience the kind of and number of activities conducted, etc. are some of the features considered in input evaluation. In evaluating effect, the main concern is to measure the results or the outcomes of the efforts made in terms of intended objectives. In other words, programme evaluators want to know the extent of which their objectives have been achieved. This type of evaluation is referred to as impact or outcome evaluation.

In evaluating adequacy, the effectiveness of the programme in relation to the population, it is intended to serve, is determined. This type of evaluation is otherwise known as potency effectiveness. An index of adequacy can be computed by multiplying the rate of effectiveness of the number of people exposed to the programme. The rate of effectiveness is defined as the proportion of the target population that has been reached by the programme. For example, if a population education programme operating in a particular school reaches 100 out of a total of 1000 school children, the rate of effectiveness of the programme is 10 per cent. In as much as only 100 students were covered, the programme effect or impact will actually be felt by only 10 per cent. To make the index meaningful, it should be compared with a pre-determined level of satisfaction. For Educational Evaluations in US visit here

In evaluating efficiency, programme administrators make a cost benefit or cost effectiveness analysis whenever possible. They study the benefits derived from the educational activity in relation to the costing of all programme activities. It is called realized effectiveness. In process evaluation, the evaluator is interested to know how and why a programme works or does not work, or how the different programme inputs can be used to arrive at desired results. The problem focused and future oriented nature of population education programme makes it necessary to focus its evaluation on higher level cognitive in additional to the simple recall an interpretation of population concepts and statistics.

The “Structured Portfolio”: A framework For Outcomes-Based Evaluation

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Portfolios have long been used in education to document the activities and progress of the learner. Portfolios are usually collections of work, evaluations, and products of the learner over time. In contrast to the traditional “learning portfolio,” in which a trainee determines the contents, the contents of a “structured portfolio” are defined by both the training program and the trainee to maximize outcomes-based evaluation. A portfolio does not function as a single evaluation “tool” but represents a framework and process for collecting, analyzing, and documenting the successful acquisition of the general competencies. This process requires active engagement of the trainee in their own evaluation processes.

The principal characteristics of a structured portfolio are that it:

  • Employs a multifaceted approach to evaluation. Research has shown repeatedly that an evaluation system heavily weighted toward global faculty evaluations overestimates resident competency. Global evaluations often suffer from poor validity and reliability and fail to accurately assess domains such as communication skills, practice-based learning, and systems-based practice. Educational Evaluations in US visit here

  • Uses the principle of “triangulation.” Evaluation methods, if used effectively and properly, can be used to evaluate more than one general competency.

  • Is longitudinal and comprehensive in scope and truly represents a composite of a trainee’s competence and performance.

  • Includes evidence of trainee self-assessment and reflection.

  • Contains trainee contributions, demonstrating evidence of professional growth and performance to the structured portfolio. Keep in mind that the resident should have full access to the portfolio.

  • Evaluates all 6 general competencies by more than one method per competency.

  • The minimal components for a structured portfolio would include at least one method of evaluation from each of the following 4 broad evaluation methodologies:

  • Foundational Evaluations: The longitudinal global ratings and monthly evaluations by faculty. These evaluations should represent a robust composite of multiple assessments by faculty.

  • Direct Observations: Observation of the trainee’s clinical, communication, and interpersonal skills.

  • Practice and Data-Based Learning: Active application by the trainee of personal performance data and system information to improve his or her practice. One example would be a medical record audit of patients accompanied by self-assessment, reflection, and a quality improvement plan.

  • Multi-Source Evaluations: The perspective of patients and nonphysician health care providers should be included as part of the portfolio.