Renault Lodgy Facelift First Drive & Overview

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Renault Lodgy Overview

Personally, I love MPVs. Imagine packing the parents, the wife, the kids and even the dog into one car and driving into the sunset. Alternatively, I could call a couple of cabs, split the family, and lose the family bonding forever. Okay, the last bit was a bit extreme, but who doesn’t want their family to travel together? There is another option, of course – the sub Rs 15 lakh, seven seater SUV. But, then these, even though rugged and high on road presence, are all ladder-frame based. Meaning these are heavy, lack car-like comfort and aren’t very fuel efficient. Check for car loan at Fincarz.

The need of the hour then is a spacious, genuine seven seater, car-like MPV that’s also high on style… you know just to keep the wife happy. So far, we have had the Maruti Suzuki Ertiga and the Honda Mobilio. And though these MPV tick a few boxes, they don’t tick them all. The new Renault Lodgy though, promises to do just that.

Renault Lodgy Exteriors

The MUVs are boxy out of necessity and maximising the cabin space is more important than styling. The good looks then come essentially from cosmetic upgrades and design elements that hide the bulk. The Lodgy at primary level is also a box, though Renault has made more than a few changes to try and make it more appealing.

Renault designs are generally a bit quirky and the Lodgy isn’t any different. The front gets a hexagonal grille with twin slat chrome inserts and the big Renault Logo in the middle. The bonnet has an unconventional design with subtle creases running parallel to the A pillar. The headlamp cluster is elongated like in most of the modern day cars with a conventional halogen set up occupying the bottom half while the parking light and side indicators take the top outside-half. The front bumper looks nice with the diffuser and chrome inserts for the round fog lamp units. The slightly flared wheel arches add bulk to the front and give the Lodgy a squat stance like that of the Duster.

At close to 4.5 metres, the Lodgy is a big car and the side profile gives a better idea of its proportions. It is based on the Duster platform with an extension at the back to accommodate the third row. The roof is sloping towards the end and that reduces the size of the windows for each roof. The MUV looks slightly weird from this angle with the bulk gradually reducing towards the back and also riding on the tiny looking 15-inch tyres. The smart addition here is the chrome side mouldings in the lower half that look nice. The tail section makes the car look boxy with minimal design elements, although the contemporary tail lamp cluster does some face saving. The Lodgy badge is placed in trademark Renault style, embossed on a chrom plate, right in the centre above the number plate.

Renault Lodgy Interiors

The interior architecture of the Renault Lodgy looks familiar to the Duster. On the plus side, the trims look pleasant with a decent build quality. The plastics aren’t much about upmarket finish but at the same time it won’t leave you complaining.

The three pod instrumental cluster which was launched in the new gen Duster makes its way into the Lodgy with an analogue speedo and tachometer. It gets an information display screen on right which displays tripmeter, odometer and fuel left in digital format. The three spoke steering wheel offers good grip, has buttons to control the cruise control and speed limiter. As for operating the central infotainment and media options, there is a media rack nicely tucked on the column behind the steering wheel. Quirky it might appear but then it is useful.

Being the top end RxZ version, it had the best of all features like media-navigation screen which also doubles up as a screen for manoeuvring in reverse and parking. It has a decent resolution and is user friendly. One can pair phones, listen to music via USB or Bluetooth and navigate using this screen. Check for Renault Lodgy in Tec

Renault’s attempt in making sure the Lodgy feels more appealing than competition has paid off well, which can be seen in the right colour combination of Gris Fume and Beige used in the interiors. The nicely stitched leather seats feel comfortable. All three row seats get leather as standard for the top spec variant. The under thigh support too is decent for first and second rows while the third bench type seat just fulfils the basic need.

Unlike the sliding doors which aren’t the best in the business to welcome occupants, the large standard styled doors make great sense. Even the large windows aid the mission of making the cabin feel more airy and roomy. Our test car had captain style second row seats but Renault will offer standard bench styled seats for the second row as well with a central armrest and cup holders. All seats in first two rows get armrests. The negative here is the immovable fixture of second row seats, which doesn’t let the seats slide horizontally. This could have made more knee room for the second row occupants. Renault also claims that the third row seat offers more room than the Innova, 43% to be precise.

Renault Lodgy Performance

Unlike most of its rivals, the Lodgy is only available with a diesel heart — the popular 1.5-litre K9K. With a single camshaft for its eight valves, this four-cylinder motor may not be cutting-edge in terms of technology, but it is a very flexible unit. Like on the Duster, this motor is available on the Lodgy in two states of tune – 83bhp and 108.6bhp – with different turbochargers and injection systems responsible for the varied power output. Also, the ECUs used by the motor on the two variants are different. The more powerful version tested here, THP in Renault-terms, gets a variable-geometry turbo (as opposed to the fixed-geometry turbo on the 83bhp version) and also comes with an intercooler.

The 1.5-litre diesel motor pulls really well once revs rise beyond 2000rpm and carries on till 4000rpm, after which the power tails off. When the roads open up, the powerful mid-range means, as long as you are not in sixth gear, it’s easy to overtake cars at typical highway speeds. However, while the final cog doesn’t help you gather pace quickly, it’s a great cruising tool that keeps the engine spinning at just about 2,000rpm at 100kph – great for stretching your fuel tank.

The Lodgy sprints to 100kph from standstill in 11.5 seconds, making it, by far, the fastest MPV on sale here. That said, the motor’s initial turbo lag and the slightly heavy and snappy clutch make driving this Renault in stop-go traffic a little cumbersome. However, off-boost power isn’t too bad, and unless you really want to make quick progress, it won’t warrant many downshifts.

This engine is mated to Renault’s six-speed TL4 manual gearbox, and while it doesn’t require much effort, the gearshifts could have been more precise. To aid drivability, Renault has kept first, second and third gears on the shorter side, which allows you to keep the engine on song in typical city driving circumstances. And the fourth, fifth and sixth gears are tall, to aid relaxed highway cruising.

Renault Lodgy Driving

The Lodgy has a monocoque body with McPherson struts at the front and torsion beam at the rear equipped with anti roll bars. This setup is usually ideal for brisk handling and high speed stability, which is quite evident in the Lodgy. It handles the corners pretty well despite being an MPV and the body roll is well controlled but due to the tall stance, it tends to swing the passengers to a certain extent while cornering hard. The steering feedback is quite disappointing, being vague at the centre. Unlike the Duster, the steering of the Lodgy doesn’t communicate well with the driver having inconsistent feel. High speed stability is impressive and you can do triple digit speeds easily but the steering being on the lighter side makes you a bit nervous.

The ride quality is fantastic in the Lodgy and it eats bumps, potholes, rough tarmac quite well for avoiding vertical movement. The sorted damping also keeps those ugly clunking sound away when you hit big potholes. However, the rear tends to bob a little when there are no passengers sitting at the back. The 185/65/R15 tyres do a great job of absorbing rough roads and keeping the MPV glued to the tarmac at corners. The long wheelbase makes its presence felt while taking a U-turn having a relatively wide turning radius. Braking performance is strong and confidence inspiring with a good pedal bite. The stopping distance from 80-0 km/hr is 35.26 metres.

Renault Lodgy Safety

The Renault Lodgy has got only three star safety rating from Euro NCAP and that too for the international model having 6 airbags as standard. Renault will be offering the Lodgy in India with only dual front airbags, which is a big letdown. It will also get ABS, EBD with brake assist. Apart from cruise control, the MPV will come with a speed limiter as well. Renault currently has a network presence of more than 157 facilities across India. In order to get volumes and provide better after sales service, the French automaker needs to ramp up their presence, which they say they are doing through the year and claim it to be the fastest ramp-up by an automaker in India

Renault Lodgy Cost in Chennai

Renault Lodgy On-Road Price in Chennai ranges from 10,52,417 to 14,30,737 for variants Lodgy 85 PS STD 8 Seater and Lodgy Stepway RXZ 85PS 8 seater respectively. Renault Lodgy is available in 6 variants and 6 colours. Below are details of Renault Lodgy variants price in Chennai. check for Lodgy price in Chennai at Carzprice.

Renault Lodgy Round Up

To sum up, the Lodgy has many a positives going for it. It looks good for an MPV, has enough space that is desired by MPV buyers, is feature laden, offers a great ride, comfort and has a strong build. It is a sensible upgrade for people who want more space than their premium hatchbacks / mid-size sedans, without compromising on performance, comfort and features. It also comes across as a good car for inter-city travel or long weekend drives for families. If you are looking for a family commuter, the Lodgy will prove to be a very good one.

Renault Duster Facelift First Drive & Transmission

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Renault Duster Overview

It was the Renault Duster that had kicked off a storm in the affordable SUV segment in India. Before the Duster arrived, the Mahindra Scorpio and Tata Safari were ruling the roost but Renault clearly knew what the Indian buyer wanted. The Duster became quite a success story and it also established the Renault brand in India.

However, it’s been almost 4 years since this SUV was launched and it started feeling very outdated, what with rivals coming up with far more polished vehicles. Renault has now given the Duster a new lease of life so let’s see what we’ve got here. Check for Car Loan Interest calculator.

Renault Duster Style & Look

For starters, the Duster facelift isn’t much different to begin with from the original Duster. You do get blacked out and upgraded headlights that look quite futuristic with it’s distinct cuts and details and a set of new tail lights with a very unique LED lighting pattern. What you also get is a new grille that is better styled than the older one. And then there are the new wheels. Now although some like this blacked out design, we think Renault could have given us a far sportier and slightly larger set of wheels on this new Duster.

You also get a set of silver skid plates on the front and the rear bumper and a chrome exhaust tip that adds to the look. The overall SUV look of the Duster combined with the wide stance are still very much as they are and all these smaller updates actually help accentuate it. Although a little late to the party, the upgrades on the Duster make it look quite nice and modern and personally I prefer the simplistic lines on this car as compared to the over the top design of some other SUVs in its segment. As a final note on the design, we personally love this new and bold orange shade that the Duster now comes in.

Renault Duster Comfort & Space

The cabin is quintessentially Renault, from the odd-numbered speedometer, the large steering wheel, sub-par plastics to the quirky layout overall. When the Duster was introduced in 2012, poor interior surface feel was one of its main shortcomings. Now, though, Renault has improved the quality of the surfaces, there is still a low-rent feel to the doors and centre console surrounds… more on this later.

Coming to the design and layout, the previous model’s old-school design has made way for a somewhat modern look. The combination of black and brown upholstery and silver highlights across the centre console and the door panels do a good job of hiding the cabin’s age. The centre console’s layout is pretty minimalistic with the central fascia dominated by a touchscreen infotainment system responsible for almost all the functions on board. Rounding out the major changes to the dash are the revised air-conditioning controls which are set painfully low. Mind you, this isn’t the only quirk in here. The driver’s seat height adjuster still requires bit of an effort to operate and having separately placed buttons on the steering wheel and the centre console for the cruise control isn’t the brightest of ideas either. Thankfully, the rear-view mirror controls are no longer underneath the handbrake and are now on the driver’s side panel. For more info on Duster visit Tec.net

As for space and comfort, the Duster remains unchanged and in no way that’s a bad thing. The front seats are just about the right size and offer enough back and knee support. They also helped us to limit fatigue over a full day of full-on driving. More importantly, the rear-seat space is also plentiful with better thigh support than the competition. What’s noticeably changed, though, is the amount of standard equipment; Renault is finally offering climate control for top-spec variants while other highlighting features include rear-view camera with guidelines and an updated touchscreen infotainment system. All in all, the Duster’s cabin still doesn’t feel as premium as the competition, but there’s no denying that it’s more appealing than before. If anything, it’s certainly more luxurious than its badge-engineered sibling, the Nissan Terrano.

Renault Duster Engine & Performance

The Renault Duster comes with the same 1.5-litre dCi diesel powerplant in two states of tune – 84bhp and 109bhp. There’s also a 1.6-litre petrol engine mated to a five-speed manual gearbox. The biggest addition though is of the automated manual transmission (AMT) on the more powerful diesel version. Renault also claims to have improved the packaging of the engine bay and have strengthened it in key areas to improve safety.

The AMT gearbox is available in the top RxL and RxZ variants and comes only in front-wheel-drive guise. Let’s start with the positives. This is by far the best iteration of the AMT we have experienced till date, across makes. This ZF-sourced system works well on the highway and part throttle gearshifts are relatively smooth. You also get a creep function which is a boon in stop-start traffic.  For more offers on Renault Cars in Chennai check AutoZhop.

But as soon as you put your foot down you get that typical AMT pause as the hydraulic actuators struggle to downshift quickly enough to keep up the momentum. Even in stop-start traffic, power delivery can be jerky and upshifts at lower speeds feel painstakingly slow. It’s in the manual mode that this gearbox feels the best and there is a way of getting around this drawback by just lifting off before every shift. Unfortunately, this defeats the whole purpose of having an automatic in the first place.

Despite the slow gearbox, performance figures are quite impressive with 100kmph coming up in 13.61 seconds. But it’s in the drivability test where the Duster AMT suffers as it takes 8.08 seconds for the 20-80kmph dash and 10.46 seconds in the 40-100kmph kickdown. This makes it nearly two seconds slower than the Hyundai Creta automatic on both drivability runs.

We also sampled the AWD version of the Duster and as before we came away really impressed. The AWD variant uses shorter gearing as compared to the 4X2 variant and this helps its drivability considerably. There is loads of pulling power from the word go and even at speeds as low as 20kmph you can easily pull away in third gear. Renault seems to have made the clutch lighter too which makes town driving a hassle free affair.

Renault Duster Driving Dynamics

The New Renault Duster AMT is surprisingly a delight to drive. What came to notice instantly is that it responds well to throttle inputs. Drive with a heavy foot and the upshifts get delayed, thereby providing adequate power. The AMT is very easy to drive in the city. The good part is that the usual lag during shifts, that AMTs have, is reduced and is hardly felt while driving in a relaxed manner. Its only when you push the New Renault Duster AMT hard that the lag is evident.

Another impressive thing about the New Renault Duster AMT was that while driving in the manual mode, rev-limiter comes in to play only beyond 5000 rpm. This gives ample room to the driver for maneuvering the SUV as desired and is especially useful while driving in hilly areas and ghats. I would’ve preferred a slightly taller gear selector lever in the AMT. The lever in the New Renault Duster AMT feels a tad short and hence one needs to stretch out a bit more than normal, while driving in manual mode.

Renault Duster Braking & Safety

Talking about safety, the 2016 Renault Duster comes with dual front airbags and ABS. The AMT transmission also gets features like Hill Hold and ESP. There is also a traction control system on offer which does its job pretty well should you decide to have some fun around the twisties. In terms of after-sales service, Renault does have a not-so-good network and it just doesn’t match the quality levels of Hyundai for that matter.

Renault Duster Cost in Chennai 

Renault Duster On-Road Price in Chennai ranges from 9,19,755 to 15,48,144 for variants Duster RxE Petrol and Duster RxZ 110PS Diesel AWD respectively. Renault Duster is available in 9 variants and 7 colours. Below are details of Renault Duster variants price in Chennai. Check for Duster price in Chennai at Tryaldrive.

Renault Duster Conclusion

Despite the automobile scenario being a bit dull overall, the Duster has still come in at just the right time for Renault India. While it is still going to be a tough task to keep the tempo going for the Duster, it is quite clear that it is not without reason that prospective buyers are queuing up for test drives and causing traffic jams outside Renault showrooms around the country.

Renault Kwid Features & Specifications & Transmission

Renault Kwid Overview

When Renault launched the Kwid in India few years back, not many people knew that this small car with SUVish styling elements will turn out to be a fairly successful model for the French automaker. The Kwid has gained a lot of popularity in the Indian market and it draws sales thanks to the package that it offers. Now, the automaker has launched the 2018 Kwid which is nothing but a mid-life refresh where the interiors get more equipment while the outside makes do with minor tweaks. Renault Kwid  in Tryaldrive.

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Renault Kwid Exterior

The KWID has attracted lots of attention because of its Crossover kind of a styling which set it apart from the rest of its competition. The SUV’ish character with added muscle surely makes this hatchback appear more like a Crossover.

The KWID Climber edition which was showcased at the 2016 Auto Expo like we already mentioned above looked more brawny with the addition of a restyled bumper which also houses two fog lamps. The Climber variant will also get faux skid plates towards the front. The car showcased at the Auto expo received a tweaked front grille while the headlamp unit also gets a protective casing. However, we don’t think the protective casing and tweaked grille will be continued in this special edition model.

Walk towards the side profile and you won’t possibly notice any changes made to the side profile however the concept which was showcased at the expo features bigger and chunkier wheels. The pronounced wheel arches and the plastic skid plates are also continued on the production variant of the KWID Climber. Towards the rear profile the KWID Climber which was showcased at the Auto expo gets a protective covering for the rear taillamps while the rest of the rear profile looked identical to the KWID hatchback. The rear profile also gets a tweaked rear bumper and skid plates.

Renault Kwid Interior

Get inside the Renault Kwid and you realise that this isn’t a normal matchbox of a cabin which might demand you to take a quick gymming session or even get your head minus from the body. The spaciousness of the cabin is the first thing that one notices followed by the rich list of options and features.The front seats come with high quality fabrics and also offer effective lumbar support. The under thigh, though, misses on the essential cushioning but can be pardoned as the seats feel fairly comfortable. The legroom and headroom are impressive, however, the shoulder room is a tad tight, and perhaps we being on the healthier side felt it more. The rear occupants too enjoy as much comfort with decent amounts of legroom and kneeroom. It is just the flat bottom seats which will leave the occupants at a state of discomfort especially on longer routes. Importantly, it scores a lot more than its rivals as it has the longest wheelbase and is also taller and wider than the competition.

The steering wheel is apt in size with sufficient amount of support for that sudden manoeuvre. It is the instrumental cluster of the Kwid wherein the gizmoness is felt for real. The digital layout displays primarily the speed in big block numbers followed by distance to empty, average fuel consumption, instantaneous mileage, average speed, tripmeter and also fuel left in the tank. If that’s not all and you need some more guidance while driving, there is a gear shift indicator too. Everything packed in that tiny cluster and then there is more.Since we were nestled in the RxT variant, which is the top of the line option, it comes with a 7-inch touchscreen system with voice assist satellite navigation system, Bluetooth telephone connectivity and other host of entertainment options. Yes, you read that right, the Renault Kwid offers all of that. So the next time you plan to boast of the features in your premium hatch, think of the Kwid.

There are numerous smart storage options inside the cabin. On the dashboard, there is a triple zone storage option with the top zone offering 5L of space with a pocket for a litre class container in it. In fact, it came in handy to stow my DSLR camera. The exposed middle zone offers 3.4L of space while the bottom zone has 5.5L. The front central console too has pockets to keep mundane essentials. The door pockets can hold a litre class container each in addition to the space offered. What really makes a statement is the large and generous boot area, which is the best in class at 300L more than Alto 800, Alto K10, Eon, WagonR, Celerio and even the Swift and i20 Active. For more info on Renault Kwid visit industrynewswire.in 

Renault Kwid Gearbox

No changes have been made under the hood of the Renault Kwid. There is a 799cc petrol engine that produces 53 HP and 72 Nm. This 3-cylinder unit offers decent performance in the city but feels underpowered when you try to pick up speeds on the highway. It is mated to a 5-speed manual gearbox which offers light shifts and the clutch is equally light too. On the fuel efficiency front, this engine delivers anywhere between 17-21 km/l. This engine isn’t offered with an AMT gearbox.

The other engine on the Kwid is a 999cc petrol unit and this is also a 3-cylinder engine. This churns out 67 HP and 91 Nm. In comparison to the smaller engine, this one feels peppier and livelier. In city driving, the performance increment is instantly noticeable and the Kwid feels responsive. On the highways, the car has enough grunt to reach 100 km/hr but if you intend to do very high speeds, the engine may not feel up to the mark. The Kwid 1.0 is also very fuel efficient giving out 16-20 km/l. The 1.0-litre engine gets a 5-speed AMT too which increases the convenience quotient by a huge extent and even though the shifts aren’t exactly lag-free, you can’t expect much at this price.

Renault Kwid Driving

The Kwid has very good ride quality like other Renault cars and doesn’t disappoint on the comfort front. The suspension feels good enough to cope up with our roads. The 13-inch tyres are just enough to do their job but grip levels aren’t very good. The brakes however are fairly decent but the Kwid still misses out on ABS. The steering lacks any sort of feel or feedback and the driving experience is unexciting. NVH levels in the Kwid leave a lot to be desired because even though the engines are silent at idle, they get noisy at speeds and the sound insulation in the Kwid does little to filter out outside noises and disturbances.

Renault Kwid Safety

The KWID Climber edition will get driver airbag as standard while the passenger airbag could be provided as an option. Unfortunately, it won’t be getting either ABS or EBD.In a bid to make it safer, Renault has added more safety features to the hatchback. It now gets updated seat belts with pre-tensioners and load limiters for the rear seats. Airbags, engine immobilizer and central locking have been retained.

Renault Kwid Price in New Delhi

Renault Kwid On-Road Price in New Delhi ranges from 2,86,014 to 5,51,863 for variants Kwid STD and Kwid RXT 1.0 O Superhero Edition AMT respectively. Renault Kwid is available in 17 variants and 5 colours. Below are details of Renault Kwid variants price in New Delhi.Check for Kwid price in New Delhi at Carzprice.

Renault Kwid Verdict

The Renault Kwid is a good package and is a popular choice among people who want to buy their first ever car by upgrading from a 2-wheeler. However, the car lacks in the safety department and it scored 0 stars in the NCAP crash tests and it still misses out on ABS and a passenger side airbag. If you’re on a really tight budget and cannot stretch further, go for the Kwid 1.0 but if you think you can spend around Rs. 1-1.5 lakh more, we’d totally recommend getting the Tata Tiago which not only is slightly bigger, but also offers more features, better safety and feels like a well-rounded car.

Renault Captur Features, Specifications & Test Drive

Renault Captur Overview

Renault showed up to the 2011 Geneva Motor Show with the cool Captur — a concept car with a very futuristic design language first seen on the DeZir Concept. Nothing much was said about this concept’s production, much like every other concept, but today Renault announced that the production version Captur will be unveiled in March at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show. The production version takes both the spirit and the name of the concept and combines them with elements from the new generation Clio hatchback.

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The new Captur will be built on the same platform as the new Clio, but it will feature “a high-up driving position, large boot, modular interior and innovative stowage solutions.” Under the hood the model will be offered with the same engine line-up as the new Clio, so customers will have to choose between both petrol and diesel engines. Book a test drive for Renault Captur in Hyderabad at Tryaldrive

Renault Captur Design

The Captur is a bona fide result of the evolving crossover design trend in recent years. The segment has become increasingly competitive and accordingly, the Captur has been imbued with a quirky sense of style. It looks eccentric and very French, thanks to certain design elements like the gaping grille (with the large Renault logo) that meets the edges of the headlights, the C-shaped daytime running lights and the large front bumper. The all LED headlights are superbly intricate as are the 17-inch alloy wheels with their textured inlays.

These design highlights matched to a long and wide profile with a high stance ensure that the Captur looks modern and edgy enough to gain stares in a segment that’s becoming more stylish each time a new product is released. The Captur also scores well on the customisation bit as Renault is offering several styling add-ons in the form of roof graphics, external chrome trim, metal side steps and a rear bumper guard. All in all, the Captur builds on Renault’s recent global crossovers and appears quite stylish but is it better looking than the rough and ready Duster? We will let you be the judge.

Renault Captur Cabin

Renault has introduced a new top-end variant known as the ‘Platine’ edition. This variant gets black and white leather seats and gold surrounds around the AC vents and Media-Nav. The leather seats not only look neat but also offer good cushioning and back support. However, under thigh support is lacking for tall passengers in both rows. The rear seat too has just about average headroom and kneeroom for tall passengers. This may come to you as a surprise since the Duster has tons of space but the truth is that the Captur has a smaller-sized cabin. Seating position is high too, which gives a commanding view of the road on the upside but this also eats away the headroom.

The upward sloping shoulder on the window line makes the rear glass smaller and this gives out a feeling of reduced spaciousness in the cabin. Renault has added some leather inserts on the door panel, which is a good thing but overall plastic quality could have been better since Renault is calling it a premium SUV. There are good number of features in the cabin. To start with, Renault is offering automatic headlamps and rain sensing wipers. You get LED cabin lights, ambient lighting, new digital speedometer ISOFIX child seat mounts and a cooled glove box which has the depth to keep long items.

The Duster-inspired 7-inch touchscreen audio system houses the display of the reversing camera. The software has now been optimised to boot faster but Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are surprisingly missing. Other standard features include keyless entry, push button start and automatic climate control with rear AC vents. The ARKAMYS-tuned sound system churns out some good quality sound. Boot space is at par with the Duster and the rear seat has an option of dropping down completely but there is no 60:40 split.

Renault Captur Gearbox

On the road, the Captur could be best described as ‘comfortable’. More on that later… Now we ought to make it clear that the India-spec Captur is quite different from the one sold in the Europe. The Captur that we will be getting is based on Renault’s MO platform for emerging markets, which is why the brand has stuck with the tried and tested 1.5-litre K9K diesel motor. That being said, there is a vast difference in the way the Captur and the Duster behave on the road.

The Captur and the Duster share the same 1.5-litre 110bhp/240Nm diesel motor, however, the refinement levels are world apart. The Captur is significantly quieter on the move thanks to better insulation and a less noisy motor – one can hardly hear the diesel clatter once the windows are up. What’s more, the Captur also accelerates in a more linear manner than the Duster when the motor is on boost. For those who are wondering, there is still some turbo lag under 2,000rpm, post which the Captur pulls strongly till 4,500rpm or thereabout. The motor’s got enough torque lower down the rev range to propel the Captur through traffic without ever feeling like it needs to be worked too hard. To our surprise, even the clutch feel is different compared to the Duster – it’s more precise and not as heavy either.

Renault Captur Driving

The Captur is dynamically very sound and it was bound to be since it shares it underpinnings with the Duster. Handling characteristics are very similar to the Duster. The steering offers good feedback, sometimes more than you would like. It still has the mid-turn kickback but can be irritating at times. Nevertheless, this is the best steering in the segment as far as enthusiastic driving is concerned. The Captur is not unnerved in changing direction and while doing so there isn’t much body roll.The Captur offers a very settled ride. It is barely moved by rough and bad roads. At slow speeds, almost every undulation is filtered before it reaches the cabin. At high speeds, the rear passengers did feel a few jolts over very rough roads but overall, the passengers would find no reason to complain as far as ride is concerned. Braking performance is progressive with the pedal offering good bite.

Renault Captur Safety

The Renault Captur will get dual front airbags along with ABS and EBD. The SUV also gets Brake Assist. Renault’s sales and service network in India is limited in reach and the company still has a long way to go when compared to some of its immediate rivals. However, the French automaker is progressively increasing its dealership reach in the country.

Renault Captur Cost in Pune

Renault Captur Ex-Showroom Price in Pune ranges from 9,99,999/- (Captur RXE Petrol) to 14,10,499/- (Captur Platine Diesel). Get best offers for Renault Captur from Renault Dealers in Pune. Check for Captur price in Pune at Carzprice

Renault Captur Bottomline

Put simply, the Captur is an interesting car. At first, it looks like a generic crossover but as you get closer its European design elements stand out and you realise that there is nothing quite like it in this segment – both the Creta and the Compass carry traditional crossover design cues.The real question here, though, is whether the Captur advances the crossover game forward for Renault. It’s certainly improved over the Duster in many key areas including engine refinement, gearshift quality, cabin ergonomics and ride quality. However, it trails behind its rivals when it comes to interior quality and drivetrain options. Renault, then, have got to play their pricing card right to regain some momentum in the crossover segment. We expect the top-spec Kaptur to come in at a premium of around Rs 1 lakh over the Duster 110PS RxZ.