Tata Hexa Hatchback First Drive Review

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Tata Hexa Overview

After sincere, but ineffective attempts at changing its image with the Zest and the Bolt, Tata Motors has seen some success after the surge in interest for the Tiago, which was unveiled last year. The small car seemed jinxed initially with its first name Zica unfortunately sounding like the Zika virus and coinciding with its outbreak. But with the new moniker and a refreshed launch strategy, the Tiago still managed to bring Tata back into the reckoning in the car market. Whether its brand ambassador – footballer Lionel Messi – helped in the revival or not, the Tiago has managed to score the key goal of winning back the trust of car buyers.

Tata Motors believes that a big reason for the success of the Tiago was the new Impact design language and the engineering changes that were effected as part of the new strategy. The next vehicle from the Tata stable that will benefit from Impact design is the new Hexa. And going by our experience with the new Hexa, it is clear that this will also be another vehicle from Tata Motors that has the potential to boost the brand’s image.

Tata Hexa Look & Style

Tata Hexa is underpinned on a reworked version of the Aria platform and there are visual similarities between the two. That said, the Hexa has a completely new front and rear. Taking centre stage at the front are Land Rover inspired headlamps housing projector lamps. Sitting between the headlamps is a piano-finish black honeycomb grille, on top of which is a muscular clamshell hood. The surface area of the chrome finish beneath the grille is just about enough to look premium without going overboard. Lower in the bumper are LED daytime running lamps (DRLs) with fog lamps below them. Check for Tata Hexa price in Hyderabad at Tryaldrive.

Moving on to the side, the silhouette is reminiscent of the Aria but the body panels are visibly different. The roof tapers a bit at the end but is mostly straight. While the design team wanted a steeper rake, it wasn’t given a go ahead in favour of headroom for the third-row passengers. The wheel arches are massive, adding to the muscular appeal. Thankfully, the 19-inch twin-spoke alloy wheels fill up the huge arches adequately.

At the rear, there’s a chrome finish slat, flanked by sleek wraparound LED tail lamps. These tail lamps, we were told, are imported from a European supplier as Tata couldn’t find a local supplier with the required capabilities for this part. Rounding up the rear are the twin-exhaust pipes, which in chrome finish, look elegant.Overall, the Hexa came across as an impressively designed vehicle,which lend it a muscular look, which is easy on the eye. Unlike the loud design of the Mahindra XUV500 or the futuristic Toyota Innova Crysta, the Hexa is a vehicle one would be pleased to see day after day for years.

Tata Hexa Comfort & Space

The sheer step up in design and quality are obvious when you step into the Hexa. Shut lines and the overall quality of the plastics and materials used are by far the best we have ever seen on any Tata Motors vehicle in the past. Its great how consistently we have said this of all the recent Tata products – meaning with each car, the company is taking big strides off late. The all-black interior gets a hearty dose of leather on the dashboard and on the door panels along with the leather seats on the top of the line variant. The seats are not only well designed but also feel top notch in terms of their tactile feel with a really good grain of leather running through as well. My only grouse is the slight lack of shoulder support on the front seats and the fact that the padding seems a little harder than it should be. For more information on Tata Hexa visit Controlenter

The central console gets a touchscreen infotainment unit with navigation (that syncs with your smartphone) and an array of options including bluetooth and smartphone integration. There is no Apple CarPlay or Android Auto but the Hexa does offer an app based control system that helps you play your collection of songs from a Juke-Car App – similar to the one in the Tiago. The app also has systems like service and diagnostic tools, navigation support and options to choose the ambient lighting (of which there are eight colour options). The multi-functional steering wheel gets cruise control, audio and telephone controls, and is height adjustable.

The simple gloss black console combined with a chrome wraparound is pleasing to the eye and so are the well placed chrome/brushed aluminium accent pieces around the dashboard and the AC vent. The climate control knobs are placed slightly lower than they should have but you do get used to them very quickly. The horizontal central console on the automatic houses the gear shift lever enclosed in a black bezel. You get just one cup-holder and no real slot to place your smartphone apart from the central flip up storage space between the seats.

You can get the Hexa in either a six or seven seater configuration. Rear leg space in both versions is quite healthy and the rear passengers get their own AC vents in the centre and on the B-pillars. The third row could get slightly cramped if you are of average height but passengers do get their own storage space and charging points. The Hexa’s large glass area makes it quite airy on the inside and even without something like a panoramic sunroof, it does feel very bright – especially good considering an all-black interior can seem to make the car appear to be cramped.

Tata Hexa Engine & Gearbox

Tata has used the VARICOR400 engine, that powers the top-end Safari Storme. With the Hexa, the same state of tune has been used and power is at a respectable 154 hp, but the talking point is the 400Nm torque. In simple words, the torque is ample to move the two-tonne-plus MPV over paved terrain with utmost ease. For most of our driving duration on the highway, the Hexa was in the 1,500 to 3,000 rpm range and it returned an impressive figure of 13.1 km/l on the MID (or Multi Information Display).

This engine has two transmission options, a 6-speed manual transmission which is exactly the same as found in the Storme and a Punch Powerglide Strasbourg 6-speed automatic transmission. It is a torque converter unit, but this gearbox is well tuned for the engine. The engine noise doesn’t filter much into the cabin, partly due to the good Noise, Vibration & Harshness (NVH) proofing.While most torque converters have the inherent issue of shift shocks, this automatic is one of the most refined units we have driven so far.

The gear shifts are quick and the turbo lag is well-controlled. The transmission responds quickly to kick-downs. Along with the ‘D’ mode, the driver also gets to choose from a ‘Sport’ or ‘Dynamic’ mode where each gear is held for longer for an engaging drive when needed. It can be shifted to a manual mode where a tip-tronic lets you change gears when you want to. There isn’t a paddle shift arrangement, but with the Dynamic mode is pretty good too. The manual gearbox, on the other hand, was slightly notchy and sometime slotting the gear was a bit of a problem.

In addition, at every overtake on the highway, a higher gear change became imperative as the engine would reach its limit for that particular gear. Since the vehicles being overtaken here were trucks, the overtake happened in second gear, but shifting to the third cog while doing the overtake became necessary. Also, there isn’t any space for a dead pedal in the manual version, so you don’t get one.

Before the media drive, Tata issued an official statement about different drive modes. This became clear when we drove the manual as it came with a 4X4 system. A knob on the centre console controlled the 4X4 system which isn’t a conventional one. This unit has a torque-on-demand that works in tandem with other electronics such as hill descent, hill hold, traction control and the locking differentials upfront and rear to send maximum power to the wheels with most traction. An off-road track was laid out just to showcase this system and how the Hexa handles the rough terrain so well.

Once the drive mode was set to Rough Road, the MPV went through chicken holes or pot holes dug up alternatively, an incline where the car was taken sideways to showcase the lean capability, a small section where one side of the car was on ice and the other on gravel and so on. Here, the Tata Hexa did not fail to impress and we can bet that this system would work on an even tougher track.

Tata Hexa Ride & Handling

The Hexa’s sheer weight does come into play when you drive the car and it does seem to take a lot more effort as compared to most of its peers. At standstill, the power assisted steering does feel a little heavy and this could be a problem when it comes to parking it in tight spots. Get it going though and the steering effort becomes much better and the steering weighs up just enough at higher speeds to make it easier to drive. The 19-inch wheels seem to have dramatically altered the way the car drives in terms of overall handling and the Hexa feels a lot less vague as compared to the Aria or even the Safari Storme. And now we come to what is possibly the cherry on the cake – ride quality.

The Hexa’s sheer ride comfort is very impressive and although there is a hint of bumpiness at low speeds, get the SUV above 50-60kmph and it glides over bumps and potholes like it doesn’t exist. The Hexa is stiff enough to handle the several roads obstacles that all our Indian streets have and yet pliant enough to feel very planted at high speeds. That said, there is some noticeable body roll when you take a corner at higher speeds. We do have a bit of concern with the pedal feel that the brakes offer. Yes, the Hexa does get disc brakes on all four corners and the SUV will brake efficiently when you slam on the brakes, but at slower speeds, pedal feedback is lacking and could do with a bit faster response.

Tata Hexa Safety & Security

Tata has made no compromise here and safety aspect has also been well taken care of and that too with a very close attention. Both versions have ABS (Anti-locking Braking System) with EBD (Electronic Brake Distribution). Interestingly, there was another system to inspire confidence while panic braking. The Hexa would understand how quickly the right foot is shifted from the accelerator pedal, sensing imminent panic braking. The EBP or Electronic Brake Pre-fill then would force brake fluid through the brake lines, that would enhance braking efficiency . A test in the off-road experience was about hard braking where this system worked perfectly. Apart from this, the Hexa also has dual front SRS airbags, side and curtain airbags to cocoon its occupants in utmost safety. As safety is now becoming a paramount deciding factor, Tata should consider to keep the safety systems standard across its variant range.

Tata Hexa Price in Hyderabad

Tata Hexa On Road Price is 15,75,454/- and Ex-showroom Price is 12,99,000/- in Hyderabad. Tata Hexa comes in 5 colours, namely Arizone Blue,Platinum Silver,Pearl White,Tungsten Silver,Sky Grey. Tata Hexa comes with RWD with 2179 CC Displacement and 4 Cylinders with Maximum Power 148 bhp@4000 rpm and Peak Torque 320 Nm@1700-2700 rpm DRIVE TRAIN RWD and reaches 100 KMPH at N/A . Tata Hexa comes with Manual Transmission with RWD .

Tata Hexa Summing Up

The Tata Hexa is unlike any other Tata vehicle and has equipment found usually in luxury SUVs. It has brilliant NVH (Noise Vibration and Harshness) levels and an impressive automatic gearbox, which is a quantum leap for the carmaker. However, pricing will be critical to the Hexa’s success and it should undercut the Toyota Innova Crysta AT by a considerable. For the manual, it should be priced below the XUV5OO’s top-end trim. Things such as only one touch down on the driver window and lower plastic quality for the rear HVAC control panel are some shortcomings. That said, the Hexa is a big indicator of change for Tata Motors and hopefully production models and upcoming models maintain consistency.

Tata Safari Storme Review & Test Drive

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Tata Safari Storme Overview

Launched in 1998, the Tata Safari was the first true blood 4×4 SUV of India. With a tag line of “Make your own roads”, the Safari indeed paved its way on the Indian turf. Generating a superb fan base like none other for an Indian SUV, the Safari has got a cult fan following for itSince the time it has been launched, Tata Motors have collected various awards, accolades and achievements for the Safari. However, the ride has not been very smooth for Tata Motors as the competition got stiff with time.Carrying forward the legacy of Safari, Tata Motors finally launched the Safari Storme with a VariCOR engine. The Safari Storme with its Land Rover inspired design cues is all set to charge in aggressively in the market of Cheetahs and Scorpios. We review the Safari Storme in Lavasa and find out if Tatas can “Reclaim their position” in the SUV segment. Check for Safari Storme price in Bangalore at Tryaldrive

Tata Safari Storme Look

The exterior of the Tata Safari Storme Varicor 400 is almost same like the outgoing other variants. At the front profile the car gets a honeycomb grille, which is inspired by the international premium SUVs. The grille adorns the Tata badge at the centre, while the Storme lettering is visible on the chrome tip at the front of the bonnet. The projector headlamps and large front bumper delivers a bold and powerful aura. At the side profile the car gets new Varicor 400 badging. At the rear profile too, the only change is the Varicor 400 badging. Otherwise the car still sports the same basic design. Overall, the car looks heavy and muscular, as the Tata Safari always have been. The 200 mm ground clearance means, this car can perform tough jobs on rough terrains easily.

Tata Safari Storme Cabin

The interior layout of the 2015 Storme is again very similar to the previous model. The interiors now come finished in a shade of black along with Java Black upholstery, dropping the airy looking beige of the previous model. The centre console gets a silver finish and the Harman infotainment system has been added with a LCD screen. The infotainment system also comes with features like Bluetooth audio streaming (finally), AUX, USB and iPod connectivity. A new reverse parking system has been added to the SUV and it makes use of the same LCD screen as the audio system (earlier it was in the rearview mirrors). The Storme also gets a new steering wheel which is similar to the Zest and it is a multi-function unit. The vehicle gets a new flip-key and electrically folding outside rearview mirrors.

The cabin is very spacious and roomy and there is oodles of space everywhere. The front and middle rows get lots of legroom while the third row is pretty much cramped for full-sized adults. However, you can just fold the third row seats up and free up lots of cargo space. Tata should have offered front facing seats in the third row to make this car a proper 7-seater. The number of storage bins inside the cabin are in abundance. The driver gets good visibility all around thanks to the large glass area. The AC performs nicely but rear passengers take a little bit more time to be cooled. Overall, the performance isn’t bad but the fan speed feels a bit low. The audio system is decent. Regular users won’t have anything to complain about, but if you’re an audiophile then you will be asking for more. The new reverse parking system works well, but Tata could have installed a better screen, considering the fact that we are in 2015 now.

Tata Safari Storme Gearbox

The engine is the same 2.2-litre, however it has been updated with the VARiCOR technology once again and now it produces 148bhp of power (instead of 138bhp) and the maximum torque is the same at 320Nm. One will not feel the increase in power while driving in city, and this can be felt more on an open road. The Safari Storme’s drivability has improved and one doesn’t have to shift a lot of gears while driving in city traffic. This has made it a lot easier to drive in city traffic. There is no major increase in the surge. What the Safari Storme is again good at is high speed stability, which isn’t a phenomena seen on the competition.The transmission remains the same with the G76 Mk-II that is also there on the Aria as well. The gearbox is a bit rubbery and at the same time, the throws could have been a bit shorter. The clutch is extremely light and it makes driving a breeze in city traffic. Also, with the short turning radius, things can’t get any better.

Tata Safari Storme Riding

Tata Motors has equipped the car to response swiftly during drives. The noise, vibration and harshness are also lower than before. The 5 link suspension with coil springs at the rear wheels, and double wishbone suspension at the front ensure a comfortable ride. While the new 260 mm diameter self adjusting clutch enables seamless gear shifting, therefore ensuring a smooth ride To know more details on Tata Safari Storme  check Wwrdheritage

Tata Safari Storme Safety

The Tata Safari Storme comes with dual front airbags in the topmost VX variant while ABS and EBD are offered in both the EX and VX variants. The automaker should have provided at least ESP in this SUV considering its price, but maybe that’s reserved for the next update. The build quality, however, is seemingly good and reassuring and the fit-finish has definitely improved. Tata Motors is trying hard to improve its service with the HORIZONEXT programme but we think that the company still has a long way to go. The manufacturer has a widespread service network across the country but it really lacks when it comes to quality service, something that would keep customers happy..

Tata Safari Storme Price in Bangalore 

Tata Safari Storme On Road Price is 13,75,457/- and Ex-showroom Price is 10,86,452/- in Bangalore. Tata Safari Storme comes in 5 colours, namely Urban Bronze,Arctic White,Pearl White,Astern Black,Artic Silver. Tata Safari Storme comes with RWD with 2179 CC Displacement and 4 Cylinders with Maximum Power 148 bhp@4000 rpm and Peak Torque 320 Nm@1700-2700 rpm DRIVE TRAIN RWD and reaches 100 KMPH at 12.8 seconds . Tata Safari Storme comes with Manual Transmission with RWD .

Tata Safari Storme Final Thought

So, is the facelifted Tata Safari Storme worth buying? Tata has taken steps in the right direction with this offering. Like all the other offerings, they have addressed the quality issues on the inside, bumped up the power and made it much more car-like to drive thanks to improved ergonomics. And in the process of doing all of this, they haven’t lost out its true values like the ride quality and space either. But with the price and market in mind, Tata could have added a few more features and visual differentiations to give the buyer that much more car.

Tata Tigor Hatchback First Drive Review

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Tata Tigor Overview

The Tata Tigor subcompact sedan was first launched in 2016 at a competitive price, and within a year and a half of its launch, the model has received its first facelift. Changes to the Tata Tigor 2018 are subtle, primarily restricted to cosmetic tweaks and a host of new tech. On the mechanical front, the car remains unchanged. The Tata Tigor variants now receive a new top-spec XZ+ grade, which gets additional bits. With these changes, the Tata Tigor price in India is largely the same.

Tata Tigor Exterior & Style

Study photos of the Tigor and Tiago’s front ends and you’ll find only a few subtle differences. The Tigor’s headlights get a smoked-effect and also use projector lenses. New chrome lining for the lower portion of the glasshouse adds a bit of richness to the Tigor’s look. However, it’s from the B-pillar onwards that the Tigor takes on a whole different identity. The sedan sits on a 50mm longer wheelbase, uses different rear doors and even has a unique window line with a Skoda-like upward kink at the rear quarter glass.

Visually though what really makes the Tigor stand out is the coupé-like manner the roof flows into the tail; inspiration for the ‘Styleback’ name. The swooping roof and distinctive tail section make the Tigor look far removed from all other compact sedans that are, more often than not, hatchbacks with a boot tacked on. Certain angles aren’t quite as flattering to the Tigor’s derriére (especially on the diesel version that gets only 14-inch rims) but, on the whole, the car’s shape is attractive and sure to be a big draw.

Styling at the rear is neat, helped by the smart tail-lamps, chunky bar of chrome above the number plate and a black plastic strip low down on the bumper to balance visual mass. There are also some nifty details elsewhere on the body. See the blacked-out lip (home to a strip of LEDs) above the rear windscreen? Aside from being a design element in its own right, it’s also the end point for a neatly hidden hump in the roof that’s been incorporated to free up headroom in the rear section of the cabin. Care has been taken to ensure maximum boot space too. How?

Tata has ditched the traditional gooseneck hinges for the boot opening and opted for a significantly more expensive multi-hinge and damper arrangement. The setup is less intrusive and helps make the most of the luggage area, which, by the way, is a sizeable 419 litres. Another point to note is that only petrol Tigors will be available with the attractive ‘diamond cut’ 15-inch alloy rims. As mentioned, diesel Tigors make use of smaller 14-inchers. Tata engineers we spoke to told us the heavier diesel required the added cushioning of thicker sidewall tyres to keep ride comfort at the desired level. In all, the Tigor weighs 50kg more than a comparable Tiago. To know more information on Tata Tigor visit Tec

Tata Tigor Interiors & Space

Although there are plenty of changes on the exterior Tata Motors decided not to mess too much with the cabin inside for the Tigor. You can clearly notice that the steering wheel, dashboard, instrument cluster and everything else that you see shared with the Tigor hatchback. However, the changes do come in the form of a new 5.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system which housed in the middle of the dash.

What else is also new is the rear seat design. Tata Motors calls it a sofa because the back seat stretched to the both the edge of the door opening; the rear seat also gets a foldable rear armrest with two additional cupholders exclusive to Tigor. There are also plenty of cubby holes inside the cabin as well Tata says that there are as much as 17 cubby holes inside the cabin which is quite practical. The extended wheelbase has not only helped in extracting the maximum amount of knee room for the rear passengers but boot space as well. The Tigor gets an impressive 419 Litres of boot space at the back of this compact car which definitely will come in handy for the customers of this segment.

Overall the interior looks spacious (credit goes to the extended wheelbase), well-equipped thanks to the new touchscreen infotainment screen, automatic climate control (available on the top end variant) and JBL speakers. The seats too look comfortable because it is slightly more reclined and can comfortably accommodate 3 average side adults. Furthermore, the cabin also gets plenty of cubby holes as well which really comes in handy during long tours.

Tata Tigor Engine & Gearbox

We drove both the petrol and diesel versions, and the engines and transmissions are the same 1.2-litre 3-cylinder Revotron and 1.05-litre 3-cylinder Revotorq from the Tiago mated to five speed manual gearboxes. Power and torque figures are the same as the Tiago’s, at 85PS and 114Nm. The diesel remains unchanged too, offering 70PS of power and 140Nm of torque. However, as the Tigor is heavier by 40 – 50 kgs, the gearing has been tweaked to offer the right kind of drivability.On the road, the engine feels smooth and is quiet at idle but gets a bit noisy as you rev it. The petrol engine is the better pick in this lineup as it feels livelier even at low speeds. Throttle response is quicker at part throttle, which should make the petrol easier and more comfortable to drive in city. However, the petrol uses gear ratios that are aimed at getting good fuel efficiency and that saps some of the engine’s peppiness. For instance, you can almost hit a speedo-indicated 140kph in third gear alone!

Being more powerful, it also felt quicker to accelerate, and also has a better torque curve since its power does not taper off as sharply as the diesel’s. It also feels quite at ease while cruising on the highway.The diesel feels quite dull to drive. It is at its peppiest best in a very narrow window. Turbo lag is apparent below 2000rpm and you feel some of the turbo’s effect at around 2200rpm, but it tapers off just after 3500rpm. Any time you want to go faster, whether in the city or on open roads, you will have to work the gearbox. Gearshift quality in the diesel is also not as good as in the petrol, especially when shifting from second to third gear.Petrol and diesel both get Eco and City driving modes, like the Tiago, and Tata says the modes have been tweaked for a better experience.

Tata Tigor Ride & Handling

The ride quality has to be one of the Tigor’s biggest highlights. The suspension offers a very good combination of ride and handling, especially the diesel, which runs on 14-inch wheels. It soaked bumps and potholes extremely well, and while both versions do not lose their composure over bad roads, the diesel offers a better ride with lesser up-and-down or side-to-side movements. The petrol uses 15-inch wheels and tends to cause more movement on broken roads, though ride quality is very good. Apply car loan for Tata Tigor.

The Tigor is impressive in terms of handling too. The suspension offers confidence when driving sportily or going fast around corners. The steering has a nice weighted feel, and it is not too sharp in terms of responses, but the suspension adds to the confidence. The petrol feels more confident with its bigger wheels and a slightly more responsive steering, as it is lighter than the diesel by about 70kg. Brakes feel good, though we would have liked some more initial bite. Stability under hard braking is better in the petrol.

Tata Tigor Safety & Security

Tata Motors is offering the new Tigor with dual front airbags, ABS, EBD with cornering stability control. The Tigor hasn’t been crash tested yet but the body panels and the sheet metal feels quite solid and well built, specially when you open/close the doors. Tata has a wide network across the country and with the success of the Tiago, their after sales have become much better. The Tigor is expected to offer low maintenance with reasonably priced servicing and spare parts.

Tata Tigor Price in Bangalore

Tata Tigor On-Road Price in Bangalore ranges from 6,64,581 to 9,20,053 for variants Tigor XE Petrol and Tigor XZ Plus Diesel respectively. Tata Tigor is available in 8 variants and 6 colours. Below are details of Tata Tigor variants price in Bangalore. Check for Tigor price in Bangalore at Carzprice.

Tata Tigor Last Words

The Tata Tigor styleback surely was able to impress the crowd with its styling and also with its features both inside as well as outside. The smoked projector headlamps, stylish alloy wheels, coupe-like roofline all contributes to the unique looks of this compact sedan. The interior too gets plenty of updates as well in the form of better legroom for the rear passengers, redesigned rear seats a new touchscreen infotainment screen and JBL speakers. The car uses the same drivetrains from the Tigor hatchback which might affect the performance a bit because the compact sedan is slightly heavier than the hatchback. What the owners will also miss is an AMT transmission as well which makes driving a lot more stress-free especially in bumper to bumper City traffic. But Tata might introduce the AMT at a later stage for sure with the Tigor.